Avoid These Common Mistakes in Your Workplace Drug Testing Program

Training services in ArizonaDrug testing in Arizona can keep the workforce in top shape and reduce the likelihood of accidents or injuries. However, many companies make a few common mistakes that diminish the effectiveness of their testing programs. Keep reading and avoid these common mistakes in your workplace drug testing program.

No Random Screening

Testing a promising applicant for drugs before hiring is a great idea, but it is not unbeatable. Drug users might expect to be tested upon hiring for a job and put their habit on hold until they have passed the test. Random screening, on the other hand, can be more effective. Even if an employee passes the initial drug test, there will be follow ups to ensure that he or she did not simply slip through the cracks. This method is made more effective when testing is truly random.

Too Much Notice

Even in the case of random screening, employees are often able to fool their drug tests. This typically occurs because they are given too much notice or are allowed to take too much time to complete their testing procedure. This allows drug users to show a false positive in a number of different ways. They can even cease their drug use again, just like they did to pass the initial drug test.

No Medical Marijuana Consideration

One drug in particular makes drug testing trickier: marijuana. Medical marijuana is legal in many states, and it can offer sufferers relief from crippling symptoms. Failing to create a specific policy for medical marijuana patients can make drug testing complicated and counterproductive.

If you are interested in tightening up your workplace drug testing program, contact Oschmann Employee Screening Services or visit our website. We help businesses stay drug free by offering drug testing in Arizona. You can learn much more about our services by giving us a call at (520) 745-1029 today.

 

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